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Geologist Pall Einarsson says experts are wary of declaring the emergency over because eruptions tend to wind down slowly

by Edna Wooten (2019-08-10)


Icelandic experts told reporters Thursday there are still signs of activity coming from the Eyjafjallajokul volcano - spurts of ash and bursts of steam.

Geologist Pall Einarsson says experts are wary of declaring the emergency over because eruptions tend to wind down slowly.

Eyjafjallajokul erupted April 14. Fearing the volcanic ash plume posed a danger to planes, European authorities shut down their airspaces, stranding an estimated 10 million travelers worldwide. The shutdown cost airlines more than $2 billion, and carriers complained about what they described as arbitrary closures.

Aviation authorities introduced relaxed flight safety rules May 17 to minimize more disruptions caused by the volcano, as three of Europe's busiest airports reopened after a dense volcanic ash cloud dissipated.

The last time Eyjafjallajokul erupted, in 1821, activity was recorded on and 옥천출장안마 off for almost two years.

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